Gary Was

Professor

gsw@umich.edu

1921 Cooley

T: (734) 763-4675

Bio

Projects

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Research Group

Research Staff
Zhijie Jiao
Email: zjiao@umich.edu

My current research interests include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in a simulated BWR environment, localized deformation in proton-irradiated austenitic alloys and the characterization of radiation-induced defects and segregation by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM).


Russ Miller
Email: rusmil@umich.edu
Sebastien Teysseyre
Email: teysseyr@umich.edu

My research interests are related to material behavior in the next generation of nuclear reactor, particularly for the supercritical water reactor. In order to determine if such concept is feasible and to recommend the material to use for its construction, I study the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of candidate alloys along with their microstructure changes induced by irradiation and their effect on the stress corrosion cracking.


Ovidiu Toader
Email: ovidiu@engin.umich.edu

 

My current research interests are in accelerator physics, surface modification by ion beams and remote engineering and instrument control. Most of my recent research involves order-disorder transformations induced by irradiation.  Additional continuing interest is in the
implementation of a reliable remote monitoring system for irradiation experiments at MIBL.

 



Graduate Students
Pantip Ampornrat
Email: pantipam@umich.edu

My research is focused on the structural materials for nuclear reactor power plant and nuclear industry, especially in Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactor Concept. I am studying the effect of supercritical water on corrosion and susceptibility of stress corrosion cracking for Ferritic-Martensitic alloys. I also interested in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in F-M alloys under supercritical environment. In addition, I am interested in material analytical techniques by using the radiation interaction with materials.


Anne Davis
Email: anneall@umich.edu

My research interests lie in the radiation effects on ceramics.  My current project is testing the high-temperature radiation-induced creep in pyrolytic carbon.  My primary focus is on accelerator-based testing of fuel elements for the next generation nuclear reactors.  Since the HTGR design requires knowledge of how the ceramic materials will behave under high-irradiation and high-temperature conditions, it is necessary to investigate ways to achieve these testing conditions.  Current testing of neutron-irradiation effects on pyrolytic carbons is being conducted, but due to the low reactor coolant temperature the materials can not be tested in a radiation field and at the necessary high temperatures.  It is the desire that my research will result in an accelerator-based experiment set-up that will allow for the testing at both high temperature and high radiation.


Gokce Gulsoy
Email: gulsoy@umich.edu
Micah Hackett
Email: mjhacket@umich.edu

My work focuses on studying the microstructure and microchemistry of proton-irradiated 316SS with varying concentrations of either Zr or Hf.  Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the void and dislocation microstructures along with the grain boundary microchemistry can be characterized.  These analyses can be then be correlated to the same irradiated materials after constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests to determine the fracture mode, the total cracking length on the irradiated face, and the amount of IASCC on the fracture surface.  When combined with a reduction or suppression in void swelling, the oversize solute additions demonstrate improved radiation stability and decreased degradation.

Using a kinetic point-defect model to simulate RIS, the effects of oversized solute additions are incorporated based upon a point-defect trapping mechanism.  Model predictions will be compared to experimental data at several temperatures and doses to compare the trends in RIS.   Similarity in the trends between model results and experimental data will demonstrate the point-defect trapping mechanism as a viable explanation for the effects oversized solute atoms on the radiation behavior of stainless steels.

My work focuses on studying the microstructure and microchemistry of proton-irradiated 316SS with varying concentrations of either Zr or Hf.  Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the void and dislocation microstructures along with the grain boundary microchemistry can be characterized.  These analyses can be then be correlated to the same irradiated materials after constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests to determine the fracture mode, the total cracking length on the irradiated face, and the amount of IASCC on the fracture surface.  When combined with a reduction or suppression in void swelling, the oversize solute additions demonstrate improved radiation stability and decreased degradation.
Using a kinetic point-defect model to simulate RIS, the effects of oversized solute additions are incorporated based upon a point-defect trapping mechanism.  Model predictions will be compared to experimental data at several temperatures and doses to compare the trends in RIS.   Similarity in the trends between model results and experimental data will demonstrate the point-defect trapping mechanism as a viable explanation for the effects oversized solute atoms on the radiation behavior of stainless steels.


Justin Hesterberg
Email: jhesterb@umich.edu
Tyler Moss
Email: tymoss@umich.edu
Kelly Prater
Email: praterk@umich.edu

My research interests are developing as I progress in my education.  I enjoy studying the effects of long-term irradiation on reactor fuel and structural components. My future research will focus on structural components for ITER to be manufactured in the United States.  ITER divertor and outer vacuum wall components have shape and size issues that have lead to a desire to use cast 316LN stainless steel instead of wrought steel.  The cast steels have to be proven equivalent or better than their wrought counterparts, especially in the area of stress corrosion cracking.


Kale Stephenson
Email: kalejs@umich.edu
Elaine West
Email: eawest@umich.edu

My research interests lie in the effects of radiation on alloys used forreactor applications.  These effects include radiation induced segregation,swelling, metastable phase formation, and order-disorder phenomena.  My mainfocus lies on the influence of radiation on intergranular stress-corrosioncracking in austenitic and nickel-base alloys in supercritical water.   Myresearch also investigates the effects of grain boundary engineering onprevention of stress-corrosion cracking.