Gary Was

Professor

gsw@umich.edu

1921 Cooley

T: (734) 763-4675

Bio

Projects

Publications

Facilities

Group


Research Facilities

High Temperature Corrosion Laboratory (HTCL)
Location: 2970 Cooley Building

 

The High Temperature Corrosion Laboratory (HTCL) provides the capability to conduct corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and hydrogen embrittlement tests in high temperature aqueous environments and, in particular, simulated light water reactor environments.  The corrosion laboratory has unique facilities for conducting both high and low temperature corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), electrochemical testing and mechanical testing.  The HTCL consists of five refreshed autoclave systems (titanium or stainless steel construction), two mounted in constant extension rate machines and two in constant load machines, plus two static autoclaves (titanium construction) and a high temperature (550C) steam CERT system.  A single-sample supercritical water CERT system and a multi-sample CERT system with crack growth rate capabilities are operational.  A third SCW system designed for testing neutron irradiated materials in a hot cell is under fabrication.  Each autoclave system is isolated from the other systems with independent water and computer monitoring systems.  The lab also contains two full-featured corrosion measurement systems and two additional potentiostats.  SCC testing in both simulated PWR and BWR is possible.

The High Temperature Corrosion Laboratory (HTCL) provides the capability to conduct corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and hydrogen embrittlement tests in high temperature aqueous environments and, in particular, simulated light water reactor environments.  The corrosion laboratory has unique facilities for conducting both high and low temperature corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), electrochemical testing and mechanical testing.  The HTCL consists of five refreshed autoclave systems (titanium or stainless steel construction), two mounted in constant extension rate machines and two in constant load machines, plus two static autoclaves (titanium construction) and a high temperature (550C) steam CERT system.  A single-sample supercritical water CERT system and a multi-sample CERT system with crack growth rate capabilities are operational.  A third SCW system designed for testing neutron irradiated materials in a hot cell is under fabrication.  Each autoclave system is isolated from the other systems with independent water and computer monitoring systems.  The lab also contains two full-featured corrosion measurement systems and two additional potentiostats.  SCC testing in both simulated PWR and BWR is possible.  

 

Irradiated Materials Testing Laboratory
Location: 1059, PML

The Irradiated Materials Testing Laboratory provides the capability to conduct high temperature corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of neutron irradiated materials and to characterize the fracture surfaces after failure.  The laboratory consists of a high temperature autoclave, circulating water loop, load frame and servo motor for conducting constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and crack growth rate (CRG) tests in subcritical or supercritical water up to 600°C.  A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is also available for the analysis of fracture surfaces for sample fratured in either CERT or CGR modes in the autoclave system.  Both the autoclave system and the SEM are mobile and may be used in either the hot cell or the accompanying laboratory.

Materials Preparation Laboratory
Location: 1044, PML

The Materials Preparation Laboratory provides facilities for the preparation and characterization of materials for materials research studies.  The lab houses a grinding and polishing table for metallographic sample preparation, a tube furnace for annealing znd heat treating, an electropolishing and etching system, a jet-electropoisher for making TEM disc samples, a slow speed cut-off wheel, a slurry drill, and a microscope and camera for imaging sample surfaces.

Controlled-Impurity Helium Flow System
Location: 1038 Gerstacker

Figure shows the controlled-impurity helium flow system facility used to study the corrosion behavior of Ni-based superalloys in impure helium at temperatures up to 1000° C. It consists of a 3-zone tube furnace housing 7 quartz tubes, each of which can be supplied with a different gas mixture. Gas mixtures with controlled concentration levels of different gases are obtained by using premixed helium gas bottles and set of mass flow controllers. A discharge ionization detector gas chromatograph is used to analyze the gas mixture entering and exiting out of the furnace.

Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory
Location: 120 NAME
The Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (MIBL) for Surface Modification and Analysis was established in October of 1986. The Laboratory is part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences in the College of Engineering, and is located on the University of Michigan’s North Campus. MIBL is part of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN). The laboratory was created for the purpose of advancing our understanding of ion-solid interactions by providing unique and extensive facilities to support both research and development in the field. Researchers have available to them several instruments for conducting ion beam surface modification and ion beam surface analysis under a wide range of conditions. Experiments can be conducted at high or low temperature, in ultra-high vacuums, in a reactive gas and in short turnaround times. A knowledgeable scientific staff and a large number of supporting facilities are also available for surface preparation and analysis.