Micah Hackett

Gary Was

Professor

gsw@umich.edu

1921 Cooley

T: (734) 763-4675

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mjhacket@umich.edu
Office: 2940 Cooley
734-936-0266 B.S. Nuclear Engineering
M.S. Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

My work focuses on studying the microstructure and microchemistry of proton-irradiated 316SS with varying concentrations of either Zr or Hf.  Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the void and dislocation microstructures along with the grain boundary microchemistry can be characterized.  These analyses can be then be correlated to the same irradiated materials after constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests to determine the fracture mode, the total cracking length on the irradiated face, and the amount of IASCC on the fracture surface.  When combined with a reduction or suppression in void swelling, the oversize solute additions demonstrate improved radiation stability and decreased degradation.

Using a kinetic point-defect model to simulate RIS, the effects of oversized solute additions are incorporated based upon a point-defect trapping mechanism.  Model predictions will be compared to experimental data at several temperatures and doses to compare the trends in RIS.   Similarity in the trends between model results and experimental data will demonstrate the point-defect trapping mechanism as a viable explanation for the effects oversized solute atoms on the radiation behavior of stainless steels.

My work focuses on studying the microstructure and microchemistry of proton-irradiated 316SS with varying concentrations of either Zr or Hf.  Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the void and dislocation microstructures along with the grain boundary microchemistry can be characterized.  These analyses can be then be correlated to the same irradiated materials after constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests to determine the fracture mode, the total cracking length on the irradiated face, and the amount of IASCC on the fracture surface.  When combined with a reduction or suppression in void swelling, the oversize solute additions demonstrate improved radiation stability and decreased degradation.
Using a kinetic point-defect model to simulate RIS, the effects of oversized solute additions are incorporated based upon a point-defect trapping mechanism.  Model predictions will be compared to experimental data at several temperatures and doses to compare the trends in RIS.   Similarity in the trends between model results and experimental data will demonstrate the point-defect trapping mechanism as a viable explanation for the effects oversized solute atoms on the radiation behavior of stainless steels.